Category Archives: General Business

Business Has A Short Memory! Job Design Still Matters!

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Dust off your archives and check out where you’ve been. There can be lost gold.

Over years it’s easy to forget even the really useful things. Then one day you rediscover them and wonder why they disappeared in the first place. Nowhere is this truer than in the corporate world.

New business trends and ideas easily swamp us seemingly rendering older ideas obsolete. Employee Engagement has been a big thing for businesses over the last 10 years. To go with that has been a head-spinning number of ‘models’. Just search ’employee engagement models’ and then click on images. There are hundreds of illustrations of employee engagement models and a quick scan can give a good idea of how diverse the models and language can be. That all points to an idea with some theoretical underpinnings, some will be well researched however there will be a lot of work relying on surface validity (it seems to make sense). However, for this post, it is about what gets forgotten in this emphasis. For me looking at the engagement literature reminded of good work done in the 1970’s and 80’s on job design which gets very little or no explicit mention in any of the models. Even the term job design sounds so last century, mechanistic, old-fashioned and too slow for this agile, divergent, disruptive, digital age. That is rubbish of course, every job has certain characteristics or a design if you prefer. (Regardless, the whole topic was swamped by four ideas that were believed to mediate motivated performance, the belief that the nature of work was changing, the opportunity for social contact, the person’s actual skill levels, and ambition. If you’re interested then read this 2010 article by Greg R. Oldham and J. Richard Hackman. )

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Deregulation, Trump and Being Careful What You Ask For!

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Pittsburgh: One reason regulations were developed.

Regulation: A rule or directive enforced by an authority.

Trump has started rolling back regulation because proponents argue regulation costs jobs. Like most things it’s never really so simple e.g. rolling back the Clean Water Provisions allowing Kentucky coal miners to pollute streams and water tables impacts negatively on the communities the miners live in and those downstream. Many miners need the work and if the job bump happens then they and other members of the community will also need to endure the negative impacts, which will come later. It is also likely to see lower standards in any new mines and that comes with a hefty public cost – refer to Mining is Transient.  In the end, the mining community will still need to face the problem that the amount of coal mined will reduce, and the number of jobs will reduce.

Why regulations?: Business doesn’t generally like regulations. And it’s true there is a history of bad, outdated and poorly implemented regulations that do need reform. There are also good, well structured and implemented regulations that act to protect us and that includes business.

Regulations are generally assumed to be negative for business and a cost and (in the case of the USA particularly) they can be presented as unnecessary government interference/intrusion. The exceptions are when regulations help maintain a business’s competitive position e.g. stopping or limiting others entering their market. Then a  Continue reading

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Mining & Resources: Behind The Political Rhetoric

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From Queensland Mining and Energy Journal

Can Australia be ‘open for business’ and more strategic about the extraction and use of it’s resources at the same time? And does it really need to limit public scrutiny and make mining protections and applications easier to get through? Mining and resource extraction is absolutely essential to our industrial society. However the mining sector is powerful and influences government in ways that distort good economic and social policy.

It’s Transient:  Use public transport or a smart phone and you’re using a multitude of mined products. It takes a lot of money to do and a lot of money is made. Also keep in mind that all mining and resource extraction is transient though some projects are more transient than others. In any location it comes and it goes. It’s important when considering any project e.g. coal seam gas (CSG) extraction with it’s thousands of transient sites (4,489 Queensland sites in 2011) and environmental and social impacts. Income from any particular CSG site is relatively short lived 5 to 20 years.

Hidden Costs and Industry Strategy: Besides the potential to leave behind a very Continue reading

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